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Tokyo Olympics tennis – who’s in and who’s out?


Tokyo Olympics tennis – who’s in and who’s out?

With so much uncertainty surrounding this year’s Games and which players will go, here’s our guide to the Tokyo Olympics tennis.

With the postponed Olympics just around the corner, the tennis world turns it’s eyes to the quadrennial (except this time) event for the next big thing on the calendar.

Who will play, who will not, and who is yet to confirm their participation? Find out with our summary of the latest news.

Playing

Many of the top women’s players are set to compete in Tokyo Olympics tennis, including Wimbledon champion and world No. 1 Ashleigh Barty, as well as Japanese superstar and world No. 2 Naomi Osaka.

Top-10 players Aryna Sabalenka, Elina Svitolina, Karolina Pliskova, Iga Swiatek and Garbine Muguruza are all set to compete, with Sabalenka, Pliskova and Swiatek all making their Olympic debuts.

On the men’s side, world No. 1 Novak Djokovic has confirmed his participation in the tournament. The Serbian is on to complete the Golden Slam of winning all four Grand Slams and the Olympics in a calendar year.

Beyond the Serb, Daniil Medvedev, Stefanos Tsitsipas, Alexander Zverev, Andrey Rublev and Matteo Berrettini are confirmed to be going to Tokyo among the top-10.

Beyond the top-10, two-time defending champion Andy Murray will play too, both in singles and doubles, while Jennifer Brady and 17-year-old Coco Gauff will head up the women’s contingent for the USA.

Further competitors

Men’s Singles: Schwartzman, De Minaur, Auger-Aliassime, Cilic, Monfils, Hurkacz, Humbert, Evans, Fucsovics, Nishikori, Bublik, Karatsev, Khachanov, Carreno Busta, Davidovich Fokina

Women’s Singles: Kvitova, Krejcikova, Konta, Bertens, Jabeur, Pegula, Badosa, Suarez Navarro, Pavlyuchenkova, Ostapenko

Not Playing

With Covid concerns in Japan and rigid restrictions in place for players, there are many notable absences from the tournament.

Rafael Nadal will not take part for the first time since 2012, though he already has both a singles (2008) and doubles (2016) gold to his name.

Roger Federer has announced his withdrawal due to a knee injury “setback” suffered during the grass court season. The 39-year-old – who also missed the 2016 Rio Games through injury – won doubles gold in 2008 and silver in singles in 2012.

Serena Williams will also be foregoing the Games and so will not add to her four gold medals this year, while compatriot Madison Keys also will not play.

Dominic Thiem and Denis Shapovalov have both decided against playing in Tokyo, citing poor form and safety concerns respectively.

Sofia Kenin and Bianca Andreescu have also dropped out, while Simona Halep and 2016 champion Monica Puig are out due to injury.

Stan Wawrinka is also nursing injury and will not be present at the Games, while American men Reilly Opelka, John Isner and Taylor Fritz are all out, leaving Frances Tiafoe to head the men’s contingent for the US.

Juan Martin Del Potro – who won silver in 2016 and bronze in 2012 – will not participate as he continues to prepare for his comeback. The Argentine has not played since Queen’s in 2019 due to knee injuries.

Another Rio silver medallist, Angelique Kerber, decided against playing in Tokyo so as to let her body rest to be ready for the rest of the summer.

Victoria Azarenka – a gold medallist in mixed doubles bronze medallist in singlesat the 2012 London Games – has withdrawn due to “challenges” of the pandemic.

Further Absences

Men’s Singles: Goffin, Garin, Kyrgios, Bautista Agut, Ruud, Evans

Women’s Singles: Johanna Konta

For more information check out the full entry list for the Tokyo Olympics.


Tokyo Olympics tennisTokyo Olympics tennis – who’s in and who’s out?

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