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Are dogs self-aware? A new study reveals what canines think


The field of dog behavioral studies has exploded in recent years. Scientists have unpacked everything from the best way to train your pooch to how dogs learn words (spoiler: just like babies).

But dog researchers are just getting started. A study published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports suggests dogs — much like humans — experience an important manifestation of self-representation: body awareness.

Some background — Self-representation is the somewhat abstract concept centering around the image that we hold of ourselves in our own mind.

Self-representation involves the construction of one’s own identity, which you do every time you take a selfie.

A dog standing at a window. The dog study explores body awareness, which involves the body’s position, especially as it relates to the surrounding environment.Shutterstock

But there’s a more basic aspect of self-representation — “body awareness” or the recognition of the body’s position, especially as it relates to the surrounding environment. Human babies as young as five months old have been able to recognize their own moving legs on video footage, for example.

Self-representation has long been seen as a fairly distinct human trait, but scientists question whether or not it can manifest in animals through body awareness.

Researchers have tried exploring the idea of body awareness in elephants, but unaccounted factors — such as the elephant’s overpowering strength — prevented scientists from yielding full answers.

Given dogs’ close proximity to humans, the researchers in this study wanted to explore the concept of body awareness in man’s best friend.

“Self-awareness is a rather poorly investigated area of dog cognition,” co-author Péter Pongrácz tells Inverse. Pongrácz is a researcher associated with Eötvöz Loránd University in Hungary.

Actual footage of the experimental conditions that were included in the research. Each scene is preceded by a short description of the experimental condition. Credit: Rita Lenkei

How they did it — Researchers placed dogs on a small mat to test their ability to comprehend body awareness.

“Body awareness is a mental capacity to organize someone’s action by taking in consideration their own body ‘exists,'” Pongrácz says.

“Our test put dogs into a situation where they could solve a task only if they removed themselves from a mat, because otherwise by standing on the mat, they would not be able to pick up a toy that was attached to the mat.”

The experimenter stood to one side of the mat, and the dog’s owner stood to another side. The dog’s owner would issue commands to the dog to bring certain objects that the researcher placed either on the ground or on the mat.

“Body awareness is a mental capacity to organize someone’s action by taking in consideration their the own body ‘exists.'”

Out of 54 adult dogs selected, 32 passed preliminary tests the scientists implemented to rule out pups that could affect the accuracy of the findings, such as those dogs that experienced sensitivity to the movement of the mat.

For the dogs included in the study, researchers implemented several tests, two of which were performed specifically to understand dogs’ knowledge of body awareness.

In the first, the researchers placed the dogs in the ‘testing condition,’ which entailed attaching a knotted ball to the mat. Since the ball was attached to the mat, the dogs would be unable to bring the object to its owner unless they got off the mat. The dogs realized this dilemma and quickly got off the mat.

In the second, they created a control experiment by attaching the object to the ground underneath the mat. Basically, the researchers were asking if the dogs understood the difference between there is…



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